Adams State history professor featured in Colorado Experience Documentary

(01-19-2018)

a sepia toned photo of sand dunes with cloudy sky above and flowing creek below

The Adams State University Luther Bean Museum assisted the Colorado Experience documentary series with the episode "Settling the Sand Dunes." The show includes footage of Dr. Nick Saenz, assistant professor of history and LBM Advisory Committee member, in the Luther Bean Museum, speaking about the history of the Sand Dunes region.

Tawney Becker, museum collections manager, said when the producer of the show contacted her regarding the use of photos from the museum collection, she assigned the project to Adams State art student and current LBM work-study student Lucie Olivas. "I have had the pleasure of experiencing a variety of museum duties," Olivas said. "It has been a great opportunity." Nicole Trujillo, Nielsen Library electronics resources and discovery librarian, also helped supply photos from the Nielsen Library archive collection.

Eric Hernandez, Colorado Experience Roadshow associate producer, appreciated the assistance of Saenz, Becker, and Olivas. "On behalf of Rocky Mountain PBS, thank you for helping us tell the story of Settling the Sand Dunes on Colorado Experience."

A free premiere screening of the episode will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 24, in McDaniel Hall room 101. "Let's pack the house and raise awareness of this incredible story," Hernandez added. Adams State parking lots do not require parking permits after 5 p.m.

About "Colorado Experience"

Rocky Mountain PBS' local history series "Colorado Experience" explores the people, events and places that have shaped Colorado. Now in its fifth season, "Colorado Experience" airs Thursdays at 7:30pm on Rocky Mountain PBS. Watch full episodes at RMPBS Colorado Experience.

About "Settling the Sand Dunes"

Located near Great Sand Dunes National Park, The Trujillo Homestead and The Medano Zapata Ranch have a history dating back to Paleo Indians, with early Spanish explorers and New Mexican sheep herders and cattle ranchers settling the area in the 1800s. Today, these National Historic Landmarks provide a window to the past and a refuge for rare plants and wildlife. Discover how these picturesque retreats have become Colorado's sanctuary for many wetland birds, rare plants and insects, and of course cattle and bison.